Department List


Department of Cardiology


 

 

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Cardiology is concerned with the normal functionality of the heart and the deviation from a healthy heart. Many disorders involve the heart itself but some are outside of the heart

Disorders of the heart lead to heart disease . Cardiovascular disease and can lead to a significant morbidity and mortality

Contrary to a basic understanding of the cardiovascular system, the heart cannot itself receive enough oxygen and nutrients from the blood it pumps and it must be supplied with blood as if it  were any other organ in the body. Unlike the systemic organs the heart receives perfusion in the phase of diastole rather than systole. This circulation of blood is called the coronary circulation. The coronary circulation consists of coronary arteries and coronary veins.

Disorders of the coronary circulation can have devastating effects to the heart since damage to the heart can reduce coronary circulation which causes further damage. A few examples are presented, as follows:

 Acute coronary syndrome (ACS)

Acute coronary syndrome is a broad term encompassing many acute myocardial infarction symptoms.

Angina pectoris

Angina pectoris literally means "chest pain" that refers to pain caused by ischemia of the heart.

Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is the condition in which an artery wall thickens as the result of a build-up of fatty materials (e.g., cholesterol). Atherosclerosis of a coronary artery leads to coronary heart disease.

Coronary heart disease

Coronary heart disease is a general term for any reduction in coronary circulation. One such condition is atherosclerosis.

Myocardial infarction (a.k.a. heart attack)

A myocardial infarction is the death of a part of the heart which is typically caused by a blockage of the coronary circulation or coronary heart disease.

Restenosis

Recurrence of stenosis which would refer to a narrowing of a coronary artery in the context of the coronary circulation.

Cardiac arrest

A rhythm strip showing a couple beats of normal sinus rhythm followed by an atrial beat and asystole ("flatline").

Procedures to counter coronary artery disease a drug-eluting stent

Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG)

Grafting an artery or vein from elsewhere (typically the leg) to bypass a stenotic coronary artery.

Enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP)

Pneumatically assisting the heart to move blood using inflatable cuffs on the legs.

Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)

Procedures to treat stenotic coronary arteries by accessing through a blood vessel.

Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA)

Enlarging the lumen of a coronary artery by forcibly expanding it with a balloon.

 Atherectomy

 Enlarging the lumen of a coronary artery by removal of atherosclerotic plaque.

 Stenting

Enlarging the lumen of a coronary artery by forcibly expanding it with a metal wire tube.

Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG)

Grafting an artery or vein from elsewhere (typically the leg) to bypass a stenotic coronary artery.

Enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP)

Pneumatically assisting the heart to move blood using inflatable cuffs on the legs.

 Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)

 Procedures to treat stenotic coronary arteries by accessing through a blood vessel.

 Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA)

 Enlarging the lumen of a coronary artery by forcibly expanding it with a balloon.

 Atherectomy

 Enlarging the lumen of a coronary artery by removal of atherosclerotic plaque.

Stenting

Enlarging the lumen of a coronary artery by forcibly expanding it with a metal wire tube.

icant number of deaths: cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death

 ARRYTHMIAS

 While there are many types of cardiac arrhythmias, they can be divided into four general groups, which you can read about here:

"extra" heart beats, known as premature atrial complexes (PACs) or premature ventricular complexes (PVCs)

 bradycardias, or arrhythmias that make the heart rhythm too slow

 tachycardias, or arrhythmias that make the heart rhythm too fast. One of the most common tachyarrhythmias is atrial fibrillation.    disorders affecting the bundle branches, referred to as bundle branch block, or BBB. While BBB is not strictly a cardiac arrhythmia (since it's not really the heart rhythm, but instead the pattern of conduction of the electrical signal that is disordered in BBB), cardiologists usually lump it in with the heart rhythm disturbances, so we will do the same.

Symptoms of Cardiac Arrhythmias

 Despite the fact that there are many different cardiac arrhythmias, the symptoms caused by these arrhythmias generally fall into only four major categories. Follow the links to learn more about these symptoms, and what kinds of arrhythmias may cause them.

  Palpitations

 Dizziness

 Syncope (loss of consciousness)

 Cardiac arrest

 Diagnosing and Evaluating Cardiac Arrhythmias

 Diagnosing a heart rhythm problem generally requires "capturing" its electrical signal on an electrocardiogram (ECG). Read here about diagnosing cardiac arrhythmias.

 Treating Cardiac Arrhythmias

 Just as there are many types of heart rhythm problems, many treatment options are available. Deciding which treatment to use for which arrhythmia can be challenging even for cardiologists. The most common options for treating cardiac arrhythmias include:

Drug therapy

Pacemakers

Implantable defibrillators

Ablation procedures

 Although many children who have congenital heart defects don't need treatment, some do. Doctors repair congenital heart defects with catheter procedures or surgery.

 Sometimes doctors combine catheter and surgical procedures to repair complex heart defects, which may involve several kinds of defects.

 The treatment your child receives depends on the type and severity of his or her heart defect. Other factors include your child's age, size, and general health.

 Some children who have complex congenital heart defects may need several catheter or surgical procedures over a period of years, or they may need to take medicines for years.

 Catheter Procedures

 Catheter procedures are much easier on patients than surgery. They involve only a needle puncture in the skin where the catheter (thin, flexible tube) is inserted into a vein or an artery.

 Doctors don't have to surgically open the chest or operate directly on the heart to repair the defect(s). This means that recovery may be easier and quicker.

 The use of catheter procedures has increased a lot in the past 20 years. They have become the preferred way to repair many simple heart defects, such as atrial septal defect (ASD) and pulmonary valve stenosis

For pulmonary valve stenosis, the doctor inserts a catheter into a vein and threads it to the heart’s pulmonary valve. A tiny balloon at the end of the catheter is quickly inflated to push apart the leaflets, or "doors," of the valve.

Then, the balloon is deflated and the catheter and ballon are withdrawn. This procedure can be used to repair any narrowed valve in the heart.

 to help guide the catheter, doctors often use echocardiography (echo), transesophageal (tranz-ih-sof-uh-JEE-ul) echo (TEE), and coronary angiography (an-jee-OG-rah-fee).

 TEE is a special type of echo that takes pictures of the heart through the esophagus. The esophagus is the passage leading from the mouth to the stomach. Doctors also use TEE to examine complex heart defects.

 

Surgery

A child may need open-heart surgery if his or her heart defect can't be fixed using a catheter procedure. Sometimes one surgery can repair the defect completely. If that's not possible, the      child may need more surgeries over months or years to fix the problem.

 Cardiac surgeons may use open-heart surgery to:

  • Close holes in the heart with stitches or a patch
  • Repair or replace heart valves
  • Widen arteries or openings to heart valves
  • Repair complex defects, such as problems with the location of blood vessels near the heart or how they are formed

 Rarely, babies are born with multiple defects that are too complex to repair. These babies may need heart transplants. In this procedure, the child's heart is replaced with a healthy heart from a deceased child. The heart has been donated by the deceased child’s family.

 

 

 

 

 

Doctor With This Department
DoctorName: Dr. Rakesh Jindal
Education:MBBS, MD (PGI),DM (AIMS)
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Doctor With This Department
DoctorName: Dr. Saket Goyal
Education:MBBS, MD, DM, FACC
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Doctor With This Department
DoctorName: Dr. Siddharth Sethi
Education:MBBS, MD, DNB
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Doctor With This Department
DoctorName: Dr. Atul Rathore
Education:MD, DNB
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Consultation Time
Monday To Saturday
8.00AM To 8.00PM
Sunday
10.00AM To 2.00PM
Location
Kota Heart Institute & Multi Speciality Hospital
10A Talwandi, KOTA-324005(Raj.)
Contact no.: 0744-3015000, 5001
Enquiry no.: +91-93518-38005
                 
+91-98292-28175
Fax no.: 0744-2407002 / 3015003 / 2405010
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